Unfiltering Leadership and Learning

A mentor once said to me that we administrators all have to watch out for our filters. He was a mentor before the topic of “the filters”, you know the ones I mean, became a different kind of headache for some contemporary administrators.  But, I think his reference applies to any kind of filters in our lives, even virtual ones.

student writing on desktop

Using desk surfaces as a writing spaces challenged my filters- now I get it after working with teachers who allow kids to do so, and do so themselves at times.

Over-filtering can be one of the greatest sources of failures in our individual thinking and that of our systems. It’s why I keep a little mental list of the four failures of government – imagination, policy, management, and capability – that the 9/11 Commission identified in their final report as root causes of 9/11. It’s why I am conscious of Ellen Langer’s distributed and mindful leadership as a frame for thinking about why individual leaders working alone are poor predictors of the future. It’s why I believe in finding new pathways to advance our work and the concept of “terroir” and scaling across not up (from Walk Out, Walk On), rather than thinking all schools should or can implement identical solutions, even when they’re trying to address the same challenges. Why?

There are no “one size fits all” answers. There are no magic formulas. In this day and age, there are no standard problems, and no standard solutions. The Pentagon staff articulates that in their work, and so should we. No two school communities, no two grade-level teams, and no two parents, children or teachers are exactly alike.  As @yongzhaoUO says, we need to consider the uniqueness of the local work we do rather than focusing on mass standardization.

Filters tend to push us towards seeing different situations similarly, rather than recognizing that no two are the same. Filters tend to cause us to go to the same people for feedback – often people who reinforce our own perspectives and ideas. Filters are why we lack the capability over time to see stains on our own wallpaper. Filters are why as school administrators we don’t always get or attend to the full breadth and depth of information we need. Filters can be our worst enemy when it comes to decision-making.  We all filter.

Our brains must filter to accomplish anything in a given day. Others filter for us. Sometimes because they see it as necessary to getting work done in priority order. Sometimes, it’s to advance someone’s perspective. We need to be aware of that and constantly monitor how our filters, and those of others, impact our work, and ultimately impact how our work impacts young people we serve.

1950 classroom

Source: genderroles1950.blogspot.com

When we work in isolation , and we all need that time sometimes, we don’t consider a full range of ideas and possibilities to help find solutions to challenges in front of us. While I’m not an impulsive person (well, maybe just slightly impulsive), I’ve found that time to think and reflect with others who represent diversity of background and expertise isn’t just a luxury, it’s a necessity. Over years in leadership roles, I’m still learning to slow down, seek advice, and take time to consider decisions – and to work on lowering, not raising my filters.  Pretty often, I don’t hear what I’d like to hear when I go outside my own personal filters, but usually it’s what I need to hear.

I’ve also learned it’s important to periodically change my work environment because my personal filters can cause me to stop seeing what’s around me – the proverbial stains on the wallpaper no longer exist in my line of sight. It’s why I’ll occasionally ride a school bus to chat with a driver, help a custodian stack chairs after a program, serve food in a cafeteria, or teach or co-teach a lesson. I need to work outside the hierarchy to understand the impact of decisions on those most affected by them. It’s also why I spend time in Twitter.

In using Twitter, we can either set up situations where we lower filters or even maintain a different version of face-to-face filters in the virtual world.

If I chose to follow people who express the same opinions and ideas that I’m drawn to, then I’d end up with the same echo chamber that can exist in my professional work environment if I’m not constantly attending to that. I’ve pushed myself to look for and follow people with different points of view, people who work in very different fields than education, people who ask hard questions, challenge authority, and who don’t accept the way it is as the way it has to be. I’ve found people with great educational expertise around the world who do things very differently from the practices used in my own work spaces.  Twitter has become a “go to” tool that lowers filters and helps me consider other possibilities, options, and potential new pathways for improving our work to serve learners well. Without access I wouldn’t know:

@catherinecronin @lasic @largerama @poh @colonelb @joemazza @liamdunphy @tomwhitby @flourishingkids @doremi @mrami2 @saorog @gravesle @jguarr @blogbrevity @jonbecker @grandmaondeck and literally thousands of valued voices sharing ideas, resources, and questions routinely on twitter as well as in #ce12 #cpchat, #edchat, #musedchat #edchatie #ccglobal #engchat #ntchat #ptchat #nwp #ideachat and around other waterholes every day,

hundreds of superintendents on @daniellfrazier’s supts list who offer perspectives on challenges I face daily in a similar role,

@monk51295 @maryannreilly @paulallison and the book Walk Out Walk On  and why we should consider a different option than simply “scaling up” educational programs,

@karenjan and @irasocol @devenkblack  the #spedchat regulars and Universal Design for Learning and a range of accessibility solutions that allow children’s capabilities to emerge,

@saorog and #Kinect2Scratch and to send some teachers to #scratchmit2012,

the work of @bkayser11 @mthornton78 @paulawhite @mtechman @epaynemls @chadsansing @mpcraddock @khhoward34 @lousygolfer45 @sresmusic  @jatcatlett @wingfriends @jengrahamwright and many other teachers who work in schools and with me in #acps district and,

@mcleod and other fearless leaders at every level of our educational work who contribute to #leadershipday12 this year and in the past.

So, when we reflect upon what we don’t consider, don’t ask, and don’t learn when we have our filters up, I’d suggest we consider these questions:

Why do we think that filtering social media and virtual learning tools – Youtube, Skype, Wikipedia, Twitter and others, even Google for heaven’s sake – makes sense for either us or our learners?

Why not teach them what we’re all learning here; how to navigate and learn the shifting protocols, rules, etiquette and boundaries associated with digital citizenship and literacy so we can take full advantage of opportunities to lower filters and learn?

Otherwise, we deny ourselves and our young people a world of opportunities that allow them to learn from experts and access the tools they need to search, connect, communicate and make.  Otherwise, we block them from being able to consider that the way they think could be informed by points of view from people all over the world with different knowledge and informed understandings of science, maths, history, economics, the arts, and literacy.

Filtering, virtual or not, limits all of us from exploring beyond horizons of what we define as possible to learn. It was true for those who tried to limit the work of Galileo.

image of galileo with telescope

Source: Galileo With Telescope Image
pbs.org

And, it’s true for young people and us today. So, unblock your filters and allow your learners and you to find a different learning world – one of panoramas, 360s, microscopic, bird’s eye to fish eye, and telescopic points of view.  We’ll all be better critical thinkers, creators, problem-solvers, designers, builders, producers, and engineers as a result of it.

kids drawing map on table

@mthornton78′s class at work

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About pamelamoran

Educator in Virginia, creating 21st c community learning spaces for all kinds of learners, both adults and young people. I read, garden, listen to music, and capture photo images mostly of the natural world. My posts represent a personal point of view on topics of interest.
This entry was posted in 21st century learning, educational change, Learning spaces, school community, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Unfiltering Leadership and Learning

  1. Pingback: Unfiltering Leadership and Learning « slcsdedtech

  2. Julie says:

    Really interesting article! As the “filter person” of our district I really thought about this article. I try to weigh every decision I make for our students. I am continuously caught between making resources available to our students and making sure that our students are safe. A great article to think about!

  3. Pingback: Quotes of the Week, August 20 « 21k12

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